Full Denture


When all your upper or lower teeth are missing, a full denture is a good treatment for replacing them. With proper home care and regular adjustments and relines, your denture can provide a functional bite and a natural-looking smile.

Placing A Full Denture


The process of making a full denture varies in each case, and it usually involves a series of appointments. The first step is to take impressions of your mouth. An accurate model is made from these impressions, and the lab uses this model to create the denture base. In many cases, a wax rim is mounted on the base for you to try in. This helps confirm the correct relationship between the upper and lower teeth.

The lab then creates a wax replica of the final denture, called a wax-up. You will try in the wax-up, and we will note any changes to the fit of the base and to the color, shape, and placement of the teeth. We then send the wax-up back to the lab, and they process it to create the final denture.

When the denture is ready, you try it in, and we make any necessary adjustments.

The Benefits Of A Full Denture


Dentures have many benefits. When your natural teeth are missing, dentures enable you to eat nutritious foods more easily and to speak more clearly. In addition, they support your lips and cheeks for a more attractive and youthful appearance.

Copyright © 2013, Patterson Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Conventional Partial Dentures

Removable Appliances

When many teeth in your upper or lower arch are missing, a partial denture is a good treatment for replacing them. Conventional partials are removable appliances that are held in place by clasps that fit around some of the remaining teeth. With proper home care and regular adjustments and relines, your partial denture can provide a functional bite and a natural-looking smile.

Placing A Partial Denture

The process of making a partial denture varies in each case, and it usually involves a series of appointments. The first step is to shape the supporting teeth. Next, we take impressions of your mouth, including the prepared teeth. An accurate model of your mouth is made from these impressions, and the lab uses this model to create the denture framework. In some cases, a wax rim is mounted on the framework for you to try in. This helps confirm the correct relationship between the upper and lower teeth. After the try in, the lab creates a wax-up, which is a wax replica of the final denture. Depending on the circumstances, we may have you try in the wax-up, and we note any changes to the fit and to the color, shape and placement of the teeth. We send the wax-­up back to the lab, and they process it to create the final partial denture.

When the partial is ready, you try it in, and we make any necessary adjustments here in the office.

Copyright © 2014, Patterson Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Tooth Extraction

When Tooth Extraction Is Needed

Generally, we recommend treatments that will save teeth, but when a tooth is so damaged that it cannot be saved, extraction is the best choice.

Extraction might be best for-

  • teeth that are fractured below the gumline.
  • severe tooth decay.
  • advanced periodontal disease.
  • primary teeth that are too crowded or not falling out properly.
  • an impacted wisdom tooth.


The Procedure

Before we start the extraction procedure, we may offer nitrous oxide to relax you, and we’ll numb the area with anesthetic to keep you comfortable. After several minutes, we check the area to make sure that it’s completely numb. During the procedure, you’ll feel pressure when the tooth is removed, but you shouldn’t feel any pain at all. If you do, we’ll stop and give you more anesthetic.

If the tooth hasn’t yet come in through the gums, we’ll start by making a small incision. To remove the tooth, we’ll use an instrument called an elevator, which is placed next to your tooth and is used to gently loosen it. Then, we use forceps to grip the tooth carefully and remove it.

Sometimes, if your tooth’s roots are curved or are held tightly in the socket, it’s helpful to cut the tooth into sections before removing them. If an incision was necessary, we may close it with a couple of stitches once the tooth is removed.

Taking Care Of Yourself After The Extraction

To minimize problems after your tooth is removed, you’ll need to follow our post-operative instructions carefully, especially for the first 24 hours. These instructions will explain how to control bleeding, how to relieve pain and minimize swelling, how to prevent dry socket, and what to eat and not eat.

The Benefits Of Extracting Teeth


An extraction is sometimes the best treatment choice for preventing many future dental problems. Depending on your situation, these problems might include the risk of infection, the spread of periodontal disease, cysts in the jawbone, or severely crowded or misaligned teeth.

Copyright © 2014, Patterson Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Preventitive Dentistry

Regular Check-ups

We recommend a check-up every six months so we can identify and prevent a variety of oral health problems.

Steps in a regular exam

Each visit will be different based on your situation, but generally, check-ups include several steps. We start by reviewing your concerns, dental chart, and medical history so we can determine the most appropriate care for you.

The check-up also includes cleaning your teeth. This enables us to clearly see the condition of your teeth and gums and to remove the plaque, tartar and bacteria that cause tooth decay and gum disease. If needed, we polish your teeth to smooth their surfaces and to remove light stains.

A regular check-up includes a careful visual exam of your mouth. We check for decay on the biting surfaces of teeth, signs of wear, cracks, or other problems with restorations such as fillings and crowns, as well as any abnormal loss of tooth structure.

In addition, we check the color and contours of your gums. Red, swollen gums are often signs of gingivitis or periodontal disease. We use a periodontal probe to check the depth of the spaces between your teeth and gums. Readings deeper than 3 millimeters often indicate periodontal disease.

We also diagnose any sores or lesions on the soft tissues of your mouth, screening them for signs of oral cancer.

Other conditions cannot be easily seen, so we often take x-rays. X-rays show us decay between and inside the teeth and tartar on the teeth and tooth roots. X-rays also show us signs of periodontal disease, such as the loss of bone around the teeth. In addition, x-rays allow us to see cysts, abscesses, and other problems.

We may also examine your jaw joint to help diagnose problems with your bite or TMJ. Sometimes check-ups include additional treatments based on your individual situation.

We review your homecare routine and give you advice on a good diet for maintaining good oral health and a beautiful smile.

Regular check-ups are important because neglecting dental conditions can lead to much more serious problems, such as—

  • infected teeth.
  • tooth loss and shifting teeth.
  • receding gums.
  • loss of bone in the jaw.
  • painful jaw joints.


With regular exams, we can detect problems early and help you maintain your oral and overall health.

Copyright © 2013, Patterson Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved

 

Cosmetic Dentistry

Is there anything you would like to change about your smile?? If you are embarrased about the way your smile looks or if you feel awkward when you smile, today's modern technology and procedures can give you a smile to be proud of!

We Will Give You Something To Smile About

Denton Hardie Dental has the experience to give you something to smile about. For example, a professional teeth whitening to lighten your teeth 6 or more shades. Or dental crowns and porcelain veneers can be used to correct a wide variety of problems from chips and cracks to severely discolored teeth. Tooth-colored composite fillings are natural-looking and blend beautifully with your own teeth for a seamless repair. This quality also makes them effective for dental bonding, a simple procedure that fixes multiple cosmetic imperfections.

If you would like to find out more about how cosmetic dentistry can give you something to smile about, contact us or set up an appointment.